progress

progress
I UK [ˈprəʊɡres] / US [ˈprɑɡrəs] noun [uncountable] ***
Get it right: progress:

Progress is an uncountable noun, and so: ▪  it never comes after a
▪  it is never used in the plural
Wrong: The 20th century has brought about a tremendous progress in science.
Right: The 20th century has brought about tremendous progress in science.
Wrong: During the last two centuries, technology, medicine, and psychology have made great progresses.
Right: During the last two centuries, technology, medicine, and psychology have made great progress.  
Q. How can I refer to a single instance of progress, rather than to progress in general?
A. You can just use progress on its own: They have made considerable progress. You can also talk about an advance (advance is a countable noun) or, when referring to an action that improves a situation, a step forward: Biochemists interested in nutrition laid the foundations for the next major advance in the treatment of cancer. The Act was an important step forward in child protection.
1)
a) the process of developing or improving

I'm worried about my son's lack of progress in English.

progress of:

Keep me informed about the progress of the project.

progress on/in:

There has not been much progress on the border issue.

progress towards:

The party called for further progress towards democracy.

make progress:

Recently negotiators have made considerable progress in the talks.

follow/chart someone's progress:

The documentary follows the progress of a candidate for Parliament.

monitor/track progress (= watch how something develops):

Government inspectors will monitor the progress of the scheme.

b) [only before noun] relating to someone's or something's progress

a progress meeting/report/review


Collocations:
Adjectives frequently used with progress
▪  considerable, great, rapid, remarkable, significant, slow, steady, substantial, tangible Verbs frequently used with progress as the object ▪  assess, block, chart, check, evaluate, follow, halt, hamper, hinder, impede, monitor, obstruct, review, slow, track, watch
2) mainly literary forward movement

the ship's slow progress across the harbour


II UK [prəʊˈɡres] / US [prəˈɡres] verb
Word forms "progress":
present tense I/you/we/they progress he/she/it progresses present participle progressing past tense progressed past participle progressed
**
1) [intransitive] to continue to develop or move forward

Work on the project is progressing well.

The disease progresses fairly rapidly.

progress beyond:

The talks have not progressed beyond the preliminary stage.

progress towards:

We are progressing steadily towards a ban on nuclear testing.

progress through:

Students have to progress through five separate levels.

progress (from something) to something:

Our team have progressed to the second round of the competition.

2)
a) [intransitive] mainly literary to move forward slowly

They progressed along dark stone corridors.

b) to move forward in time

The situation improved as the century progressed.

3) [transitive] to cause something such as an idea or a plan to move forward

We are meeting again tomorrow to try and progress the matter.


English dictionary. 2014.

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Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Progress — Студийный альбом Take That …   Википедия

  • progress# — progress n 1 advance (see under ADVANCE vb 2) Analogous words: improvement, betterment (see corresponding verbs at IMPROVE): headway, impetus (see SPEED n) 2 Progress, progression are not always clearly distinguished, although they can be more or …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Progress — Prog ress (?; 277), n. [L. progressus, from progredi, p. p. progressus, to go forth or forward; pro forward + gradi to step, go: cf. F. progr[ e]s. See {Grade}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A moving or going forward; a proceeding onward; an advance;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Progress — Pro*gress (?; formerly pronounced like {Progress}, n.), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Progressed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Progressing}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To make progress; to move forward in space; to continue onward in course; to proceed; to advance; to go… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Progress — (progreso en ruso) es una familia de naves no tripuladas rusas utilizadas para llevar víveres y combustible a estaciones espaciales. En un principio se utilizaron con las estaciones Salyut 6, Salyut 7 y Mir, permitiendo que las tripulaciones… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Progress — Prog ress (?; see {Progress}, v. i.), v. t. To make progress in; to pass through. [Obs.] Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Progress — Progress, PA U.S. Census Designated Place in Pennsylvania Population (2000): 9647 Housing Units (2000): 4569 Land area (2000): 2.757571 sq. miles (7.142077 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000):… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Progress, PA — U.S. Census Designated Place in Pennsylvania Population (2000): 9647 Housing Units (2000): 4569 Land area (2000): 2.757571 sq. miles (7.142077 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 2.757571 sq. miles… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • progress — In BrE the noun is pronounced with the stress on the first syllable, and the verb (= make progress) with the stress on the second syllable. In the transitive meaning ‘to cause (work etc.) to make progress’, pronunciation with the stress pattern… …   Modern English usage

  • progress — [n] advancement, gain advance, amelioration, anabasis, betterment, boost, break, breakthrough, buildup, course, dash, development, evolution, evolvement, expedition, flowering, growth, headway, hike, impetus, improvement, increase, journey, lunge …   New thesaurus

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